Category Archives: Employment Law

ReligDiscr

Religious Accommodations in the Workplace: An Overview of Employee Rights

By Scott • Wagner and Associates |

Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 prohibits employers from discriminating against employees and job applicants on the basis of religion or their lack of religion. Beyond merely avoiding overt acts of disparate treatment, covered employers also have a duty to provide reasonable religious accommodations to employees. Many workers in Florida have… Read More »

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EmpContract

If My Non-Compete Agreement is Lost, Is It Still Enforceable?

By Scott • Wagner and Associates |

Under Florida law, non-compete agreements are enforceable, subject to certain restrictions. One such restriction is that the agreement must be in writing and signed by the employee. In other words, an oral non-compete agreement is unenforceable. But what if your non-compete agreement is lost – is it still enforceable? Courts May Consider “Parol” Evidence… Read More »

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EmpLaw3

Are “Opt-Out” Arbitration Agreements Enforceable in Florida?

By Scott • Wagner and Associates |

At some point in an employee’s employment history, they may be requested to sign an arbitration agreement by their employer. “Opt Out” Arbitration Agreements are a new form of these type of agreements. If you find yourself presented with an Opt Out Agreement, what do they mean, and are they legal? In short, yes,… Read More »

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Training

My Employment Contract Requires Me to Repay Training Costs If I Leave the Company, Is this Legal Under Florida law?

By Scott • Wagner and Associates |

Does your employment contract include a provision that requires you to repay your company or organization for training costs if you leave your position? If so, you may be wondering: Is this type of contract enforceable in Florida? The short answer is ‘it depends.’ Florida courts may uphold a contract that forces an employee… Read More »

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Discrimination

One Year or Four Years? Understanding the Statute of Limitations for Employment Discrimination Lawsuits in Florida

By Scott • Wagner and Associates |

When a Florida worker believes they have been the victim of illegal discrimination in the workplace, the law requires they first file an administrative complaint, either with the federal Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) or the Florida Commission on Human Relations (FCHR). When the FCHR receives a complaint, it then has 180 days to… Read More »

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Waiters

Can Restaurants Make Minimum-Wage Servers Pay for Their Own Uniforms? Here Is What Federal and Florida State Laws Say

By Scott • Wagner and Associates |

Many Florida employers require their employees to wear uniforms. In some cases, the employer may even require the employee to purchase their own uniforms. But under federal and state labor laws, the employer cannot require such purchases when it would either reduce an employee’s wages below the applicable statutory wage or cut into any… Read More »

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EmpLaw3

No “Mulligan” for Employers: How Binding Arbitration Agreements Can Cut Both Ways

By Scott • Wagner and Associates |

Many Florida businesses require employees to agree to arbitration employment disputes as a condition of employment. However, as the 11th Circuit recently affirmed, when an arbitration provision requires arbitration as the final decisionmaker for disputes – both the employer and employee will be stuck with an arbitrator’s outcome.  While arbitration is often viewed as… Read More »

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Pregnant3

“You Are Being Too Emotional Because of Your Condition!” How Florida Employers Can Avoid Facing a Pregnancy Discrimination Lawsuit

By Scott • Wagner and Associates |

Federal law protects workers from pregnancy-based discrimination. For Florida employers, the message is simple: You cannot fire, demote, reassign, discipline or in any way disfavor a worker because they are pregnant. Additionally, if a worker does complain about pregnancy-related discrimination, you cannot engage in any retaliatory act against them. If you do, then your… Read More »

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LaborLaw5

Can a Sales Truck Be a Regular “Place of Business”? Department of Labor Weighs-in On Application of Outside Sales Exemption to Mobile Workers

By Scott • Wagner and Associates |

As you probably know, Florida employers are required to pay most of their employees a certain minimum wage as well as overtime pay when applicable. But many types of employees are considered “exempt” from these rules. One such exempt group is “outside sales” employees. The U.S. Department of Labor defines an outside sales employee… Read More »

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Employment7

Can Employers Discipline “Abusive Conduct” Even When It Involves Employee Organizing? NLRB Reverses Course on Key Test for Assessing Workplace Speech

By Scott • Wagner and Associates |

Florida employers often face conflicting legal obligations. For example, an employer must not engage in conduct that interferes with the rights of their employees under the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA) to unionize or join together to advocate for better working conditions. At the same time, if employees engage in “abusive conduct,” the employer… Read More »

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