Monthly Archives: April 2017

Employment3

The ABCs of Federal Employee Complaints: Understanding Distinctions Amongst the OSC, MSPB, and EEO

By Scott • Wagner and Associates |

Are you a federal employee with an employment issue? As an employee with a claim against the federal government for a workplace issue, you may be asserting claims concerning employment discrimination, a whistleblower situation, or a claim related to a personnel action in which you will need to appeal to the Merit Systems Protection… Read More »

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Employment5

Bringing Claims Under the Florida Civil Rights Act or Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964: What’s the Difference in Damages?

By Scott • Wagner and Associates |

If you are considering moving forward with litigation for an employment discrimination claim, you may have to decide which claims to file. While many individuals may have the option of bringing claims under both the Florida Civil Rights Act (FCRA) as well as Title VII of the the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (Title… Read More »

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LaborLaw3

Can an Employment Investigation Be Privileged?

By Scott • Wagner and Associates |

Does your workplace currently have a rule or a policy that requires confidentiality for any employees who are involved in workplace investigations? For instance, your workplace may have a policy that requires any employees who are under investigation, or who are witnesses as part of an investigation, to maintain confidentiality when it comes to… Read More »

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Discrim5

Employer Insurance Coverage for Gender Transition or Sex Transformation Procedures: Robison v. Dignity Health (N.D. Cal)

By Scott • Wagner and Associates |

If you work for an employer through which you have insurance coverage, yet your coverage does not include “sex transformation surgery,” could your employer be violating the law? As the recent Northern District of California case of Robinson v. Dignity Health contends, this may represent a form of gender discrimination. Although the case is… Read More »

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